Mary Dineen

ID # 211, (1790-1868)
BirthMary Dineen was born on 28 February 1790 at United States. 
MarriageShe married David Able.
 
DeathShe died on 22 March 1868 at Beverly Township at age 78. 
BurialShe was buried at Troy Cemetery, Beverly Township, Wentworth County. 
NoteThe source for Mary's maiden name is the death registration of her daughter, Harriet Able Gamble, in 1909.

031649, Beverly Township, Harriet Gamble, death Dec. 3, 1909, born July 29, 1825, Canadian, age 84 yrs, 4 mos. and 4 days. Her parents' names are given as David Able, born U.S.A., and Mary Dineen, born U.S.A. The informant in her death is William Sager. According to an Abstract Index, William Sager is also her executor.

The presence of Deneens, or Dineens, in Beverly is early. Charity Deneen married Thomas Lawrason and they are buried in Troy Cemetery. A copy of Charity's death registration states that her birth place was New Jersey. There was also a Samuel Deneen in Beverly in early days. He can be found in censuses taken in Beverly in 1825 and 1833. Whether Charity or Samuel are related to Mary isn't known, but given that it isn't a common name a relationship seems probable. Both Charity and Mary finished up in the small cemetery at Troy

A photo has been found at the Hamilton Public Library which is dated September 24, 1867, and was taken as the home of Peter and Lucinda Wood in Beverly. A photographer from Galt took the picture and it represents the elderly people attending a party given by the Woods. It would appear from one or two younger people that there must have been a large number of people in attendance and no doubt a spread of ages. The picture is only of the more elderly people. In it are Mary Abel and Charity Lawrason. Both have the same maiden name and they are sitting beside each other in the picture. It seems unlikely that documentation will ever be found confirming their relationship, but probably they are sisters.

One other source of information regarding the relationship of Mary Dineen Abel and Charity Deneen Lawrason needs to be considered and that is the diary of Henry Husband, transcribed by Val Husband Brook. Henry makes note that Peter Wood and his wife Lucinda (Lawrason) were at the marriage of Henry and his second wife Jane Coleman, daughter of Dan Coleman and Mary Dineen Abel. Henry believed that Peter disapproved of Jane's marriage to Henry, but Peter and Lucinda were generous in their giving of a wedding gift to Jane. She was presented with fifty dollars, which in those days would have been munificent. This provides us with no direct information as to the family relationship. Indeed, we know that Jane's brother George Coleman and her sister Harriet Coleman Nisbet worked for Peter, George doing so for much of his working life.

Many years later, Henry noted in his diary that Peter Wood had died and that George and Harriet were remembered in Peter's will and that they were connected to Peter's family. The will is no direct help for George and Harriet are remembered for faithful service as employees. George was certainly working for Peter and Lucinda as early as 1861, for he was with them at the time of that census. The accumulated circumstantial evidence is that the families were actually related through the Dineens/Deneens. 

Children of Mary Dineen and David Able

Last Edited21 Jun 2015